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blog, Mortgage Education

Making the Most of Your Mortgage Broker

Source: Which Mortgage

The process of becoming a homeowner can be long and arduous, and your mortgage broker is one of your key allies in getting a mortgage in order to buy a home. But if done right, the relationship between you and your broker doesn’t stop once you have the keys.

 

mortgage-broker-meeting

 

Depending on how your individual mortgage is structured, you’re going to be up for a renewal at least twice over the life of your mortgage – and, for many people five or more times. That means many opportunities to reconnect with your mortgage broker, not only to get you the best interest rates available at the time, but to evaluate where your mortgage falls in your overall financial picture.

A good mortgage broker will definitely want to keep you as a client over the lifetime of your mortgage, so your broker will probably already have their own efforts in place to reach out to you every so often and checking in on how your mortgage payments are coming along. They might even have a newsletter of some kind, with helpful tips for homeowners. Either way, it’s only to your benefit to have a good relationship with your broker; here are some ways that you can make the most out of that relationship over a long period of time.

Be honest

When getting your mortgage, there’s no point in lying about your occupation, your income, or your debt. It’s all going to come out in the wash anyway, and your broker can’t place your mortgage application with the best lender for you if they don’t have all of the facts. Not to mention that you’re going to have to come clean eventually when the lender does their due diligence on you. If you don’t tell the truth and lie about details on your mortgage application, then you’re committing mortgage fraud, which is something that you want to avoid at all costs. This holds true after you’ve gotten your mortgage as well – be honest when it comes to what you want and don’t want for your next mortgage term. Remember that your broker works for you and is paid (by lenders) to deal with the situation that you present to them, not the situation that works best for them and/or is easiest to place.

Keep in touch

Months, even years, may go by, but don’t let your mortgage broker become a stranger. As mentioned, your broker may – and should – reach out to you every so often, but if they don’t, don’t be afraid to initiate contact with them, even if it’s just dropping a quick email to say hello or asking a simple question. This way, when you actually need something or it’s time to discuss renewal, your mortgage broker won’t have to think, “Who is this person?”

Don’t be shy

Things change. Your broker doesn’t expect your financial realities to be the same 10 years down the road as they were when you got your mortgage. If you’ve changed your plans and now want to own a farm or move out of province or even start thinking about investment properties, don’t hesitate to let your broker know. They can only help you develop a mortgage plan if they know what your plans are; otherwise, the options that they suggest for you might not work for your short-term and/or long-term goals.

Refer

If you’re happy with your mortgage broker, don’t keep them to yourself! A large part of a broker’s business is referrals, and often those referrals come from clients who they’ve previously worked with to get mortgages. If you know someone who is looking for a mortgage, maybe even someone who is unfamiliar with the role of a mortgage broker, offer to put them in touch with yours. It’s really a win-win-win situation: good for your friend who needs a mortgage, good for your broker who needs the business, and good for you, who just bought some goodwill from both parties.

Educate yourself

Part of the reason it’s beneficial to speak with a mortgage broker is so that you can learn about the wide range of products and services in the market that they can get for you. But if you do your own research into a mortgage product or subject before speaking with them about it, then you can have a much more productive conversation about the products and see how they apply to your situation. You’ll be able to ask more detailed questions, and will probably understand your broker’s responses a bit bitter. It never hurts to do some preliminary homework.

Just like your relationship with your realtor, the relationship with your mortgage broker is a long-term one. Knowing how to make the most out of that relationship over the life of your mortgage can really work out in your favour.

blog, Mortgage Education, Mortgage Refinance

The Smart Homeowner’s Guide to Refinancing

Mortgage refinancing is a tool you can use to improve your financial future

smart-homeowners-guide-to-refinancing

By Steve Harrison
Mortgages.ca

 

Over my 10 years in the mortgage industry, I’ve noticed that homeowners who refinance strategically can significantly improve their overall financial situations.

And you can do it, too. By refinancing whenever the math makes sense, you can make incremental gains that add up over time.

 

Why you should care about refinancing?

Whether you’re considering this option now or not, it’s important that you understand the basics. That way, when you’re faced with an unexpected financial challenge in the future, or an investment opportunity comes along, you’ll have a clear understanding of how your home equity can help you achieve your goals. The more you understand the short and long term benefits of refinancing, the more financially proactive you can be.

 

What is refinancing?

Refinancing is the process of ending a mortgage agreement in order to replace it with a new one. The first loan is paid off in full and a new loan is created, either with a new lender or the existing lender.

Whereas a straight switch to a new lender (also known as a transfer) can change only the interest rate or term of a mortgage, a refinance can involve increasing the total amount of the loan and/or changing the length of amortization.

 

Why refinance?

  • To Consolidate Debt

We often recommend our clients to refinance in order to consolidate other forms of debt they may be carrying. A mortgage is the cheapest way to borrow money, so it’s often beneficial to transfer accumulated debt — from credit cards, lines of credit, student debt, car loans — to a mortgage. This way you can avoid paying the higher rate of interest on those other forms of debt.  

  • To Access Home Equity

When clients need to take cash from their home equity, refinancing is the way to do it. This is a cheap way to access cash for investing in a rental property, sending a child to university, doing a major renovation, covering unexpected medical costs, or starting a business. Canadians can access up to 80 per cent of the value of their home by refinancing.

  • To Achieve Long Term Goals

In some cases, refinancing can help homeowners increase their long term wealth. For example, refinancing could make it possible for a homeowner to move from their starter house or condo into a new home, while keeping the starter home as an investment property, thereby increasing their net worth over time.

Other benefits include:

  • Access lower rates when rates have dropped
  • Lower monthly payments
  • Add a home equity line of credit

 

Should-I-Refinance

When should I refinance?

When your mortgage term is up, you have three options:

  • Renewing the loan with your existing lender at a similar rate with a similar term
  • Transferring your loan to a new lender at a different rate or term
  • Refinancing

When the math works out to your benefit, it’s a good time to refinance.

Unfortunately, if you have an immediate need access to your home equity, you can’t wait for the ideal time and you may be forced to break your existing mortgage. In that case, you’ll need to pay the penalties involved with breaking your mortgage. Pre-payment penalties can be significant, depending on the size of your outstanding mortgage. Still, despite penalties, it can still be beneficial to refinance.

Lenders sometimes offer refinancing promotions in which they pay the costs when you move your loan to their institution. A mortgage broker can alert you to those promotions and advise about whether the lender offering them is the right one for you.

 

What are the costs of refinancing?

The costs of refinancing include:

  • If you’re breaking your mortgage, prepayment penalties will apply (amounts vary)
  • Lawyer fees ($800-$1500)
  • Discharge fees ($300-$400)
  • Appraisal ($300-$400)

Occasionally, lenders will offer promotions in which they pay the costs associated with refinancing. Your broker can inform you of these temporary offers if they apply to your situation.  

 

Do I have to qualify for refinancing?

Yes. You’ll have to apply for a new mortgage, going through the process of providing proof of income, statements of debts and assets, and credit scores to your new lender.

 

Is there a downside to refinancing?

If there is a risk to refinancing, it’s the temptation to continue adding to consumer debt after consolidation. Lifestyle changes are sometimes necessary in order to avoid having to refinance again.

 

What are the steps to refinancing?

Though some see refinancing as time-consuming, I try to make the process as simple as possible. Here’s an overview of the steps to follow with your mortgage broker:

  1. Review your financial situation and goals
  2. Find the right refinancing loan
  3. Review documents
  4. Apply for the new loan
  5. Await review of your application by the chosen lender
  6. Once mortgage is approved, broker orders an appraisal
  7. You sign the loan commitment
  8. You see your notary or lawyer, who will oversee the loan disbursement

 

Advice is always free. Call or email us to set up a consultation anytime.

E: Info@Mortgages.ca
P: 647-795-8700

blog, Mortgage Education, Mortgage Refinance

Fixed vs. Variable: Which Mortgage is the Better Choice?

Compared to fixed-rate mortgages, variable-rate options cost less for the borrower — even when rates are expected to rise

variable-vs-fixed-consider-the-numbers

By James Harrison
Mortgages.ca

 

When you’re thinking about what kind of mortgage you need, you might be tempted to do what many Canadians do without giving it much thought: They choose a fixed rate.

Fixed-rate mortgages are the most common type of home loan. According to a report by Mortgage Professionals Canada, 72 per cent of Canadians who bought homes in 2016 or 2017 secured fixed-rate mortgages.

Especially when news media stories predict interest rate hikes in the near future, borrowers grasp onto fixed-rate mortgages. They’re willing to pay a rate premium in exchange for a consistent monthly payment and a feeling of certainty.

 

But they’re not doing themselves any favours.

 

The media hype around possible interest rate hikes is often inaccurate, and the fear is fuelled by banks who profit from locking borrowers in at the premium rates attached to fixed-rate mortgages. These loans are simply more profitable than variable-rate mortgages, so banks like to create the impression that a five-year fixed mortgage is the obvious choice.

The fact is, a variable-rate mortgage is almost always a better choice for borrowers who want to pay less for their loan. And that’s true even when rates are expected to go up.

 

Feeling the variable-rate jitters?

Many borrowers are feeling nervous now because the Bank of Canada has hiked the key interest rate five times since July 2017, from .50 to 1.75 per cent, and economists have predicted more raises in 2019.

Those nerves are understandable. But when you do the math, and when you know the history of how interest rates move in Canada, it becomes clear that a variable-rate mortgage can still save you thousands in interest payments compared to a comparable fixed-rate product.

Not only that, it’s possible to reduce the risk and maximize the benefit of a variable-rate mortgage by making strategic monthly payments that are a little higher than they need to be from day one.

But more on that smart strategy in a minute. First, let’s look at the reasons why variable mortgages are a better choice.

 

Why variable-rate mortgages cost less

Variable rates are typically lower than fixed rates. But the spread between the two types of mortgages can vary.

That’s because variable mortgage rates are tied to the prime rate. When the Bank of Canada’s prime rate goes up, variable mortgage rates follow. On the other hand, fixed mortgage rates are primarily influenced by the yield on government bonds of the same term. The two types of mortgage are influenced by different factors, so the spread fluctuates.

When rates for five-year fixed mortgages are at least 0.5 per cent higher than rates for comparable five-year variable mortgages, it makes more mathematical sense to choose a variable product.

The spread is important because when it’s 0.5 per cent or more, it’s extremely unlikely that rates will go up enough during the five-year term of a mortgage to make a variable mortgage more expensive than a fixed one.

We know it’s unlikely because we can look at how the Bank of Canada’s has historically adjusted its prime rate, which in turn causes variable mortgage rates to go up or down.

When the Bank of Canada implements federal monetary policy by adjusting the prime rate, it rarely does so quickly. It moves the rate up or down by 0.25 per cent with each adjustment, then it waits to see the effect on inflation.

As well, given historical trends, it’s extremely unlikely that rates will only go upward over the five-year term of a mortgage. They may go up for a while, but then they’ll go down again because of the cyclical nature of the economy.

 

We can apply our understanding of history and make some reasonable predictions about the future. Looking forward at the next five years, we see that while rates may go up a few times over the next two or three years, an economic recession is due in 2020 or 2021. Rate decreases are the federal bank’s likely response.

With the current spread between five-year fixed and five-year variable rates, the prime rate would have to go up by 0.25 per cent about seven or eight times over the next five years for you to start losing more with a variable-rate mortgage than you would with a fixed-rate mortgage. It would have to stay up, too, with no rate drops in between.

But that scenario is beyond imaginable for most people in the financial industry. If the prime rate were to go up — and only up — seven or eight times in less than five years, we’d be experiencing a widespread economic meltdown the likes of which we’ve never seen. It’s extremely unlikely.

 

The exception to the ‘variable is better’ rule

When we look at historical data, we can see the spread between fixed and variable mortgages is almost always greater than 0.5 per cent in Canada. Over the past decade, the spread has usually stayed between about 0.7 and 1 per cent.

There was a short period in 2016 when rates for fixed mortgages were low and the spread between fixed and variable was a mere 0.3 per cent. During that period, there was a strong reason to choose a fixed mortgage. But it’s extremely unlikely that we’ll see rates and spreads like that again anytime soon.

 

Why variable rate mortgages are more flexible

In addition to offering lower costs, variable rate mortgages allow borrowers more control and flexibility than a fixed mortgage.

In a variable mortgage, the borrower can break the mortgage at any time with only a three-month interest penalty. Compare that to fixed rate penalties, which are equal to either three-months interest or the IRD, or interest-rate differential calculation, whichever is higher.

For example, on a $500,000 variable-rate mortgage, the penalty for breaking it would be about $3,000 compared to a $20,0000 penalty on a comparable fixed-rate mortgage with a big bank.

No one plans to break a mortgage, but life happens. And avoiding a $20,000 penalty can make a dramatic difference in your life when you’re going through unexpected life changes.

In addition, a variable-rate mortgage allows you to lock into a fixed rate at any point. But it doesn’t work the other way. A fixed-rate mortgage cannot be changed to a variable one during the length of the term. You’re stuck with a fixed rate for the entire five years, no matter which way rates go.

How to reduce the risk of a variable mortgage

We suggest our clients choose a variable mortgage, but that they make monthly payments as if they had chosen a fixed one with a higher rate of interest.

That means they structure their household budgets in order to pay more than the minimum payment with each monthly payment. An extra $200 or $300 per month goes toward paying off principal instead of interest before rates have had time to increase. So the borrower saves thousands in interest over the life of the loan. And they pay down thousands more of the principal while they wait for any potential rate increase.

The strategy also builds in a buffer of three or four potential rate increases. Even if the prime rate goes up steadily for a year or two, the borrower is already used to a higher payment and their household budget is not affected by the rate changes.

In the 11 years I’ve been in the mortgage business, I’ve never once had a client regret going variable, but I’ve had many regret going fixed.

What to do if rates start to rise

The option to go fixed always exists for borrowers in variable mortgages. And when the news is full of predictions that interest rates are going up, clients sometimes call to ask about locking in to a fixed rate.

We never advise our clients to take the option of going fixed.

Instead, we suggest they increase their payments as if they did lock in. Or we suggest they break the current variable-rate mortgage and set up a new one with an even better variable discount.

What to look for in a fixed mortgage

As a licensed mortgage broker, I consider it my responsibility to explain the pros and cons of fixed-rate and variable-rate products. And I keep an eye on the spread, so I know I’m always giving up to date advice on which option makes more mathematical sense. But some borrowers will choose a fixed mortgage every time, no matter what the math indicates.

In that case, and also when the spread does drop below the 0.5 per cent mark, it’s important to choose the best possible terms for a fixed-rate mortgage, paying close attention to prepayment penalties.

While most borrowers have no intention of breaking their mortgage, about 60 per cent of Canadians do. So if you’re going fixed, you must look carefully at the penalties you’ll incur if you end up having to break it.

We recommend our clients choose non-bank lenders (also known as monoline lenders) when they do choose a fixed-rate mortgage. These dedicated mortgage lenders calculate IRD penalties differently than banks do. While banks use the posted rate to calculate the IRD, monoline lenders use a rate that’s an average of about 1.5 per cent lower. That means a significantly lower penalty when your loan is with a monoline lender.

 

How a mortgage broker helps

As a licensed mortgage broker, I help my clients get the mortgage that’s right for them by negotiating on their behalf with banks, credit unions, and other mortgage providers for the best rates and products. The cost of my services are free to home buyers. My fees are paid by lenders.

 

Interested in refinancing to reduce your mortgage costs? Call me to set up a free consultation.

blog, Mortgage Education

What Is Your Home Worth?

Everything You Need To Know About Home Appraisals

what-is-your-home-worth

By Scott Nazareth
Mortgages.ca

 

Getting an appraisal is a key part of the process of getting a mortgage. It’s one you should understand when you make an offer on a home, as the appraisal process can move quickly after you make a winning bid.

What is an appraisal?

Appraisals assess the current market value of a property.

Mortgage lenders sometimes require a formal appraisal to determine a home’s value for mortgage purposes — regardless of the price that has been paid for the property. They want to be sure a house is actually worth what they’re lending its purchaser.

This part of the buying process happens after your offer to purchase has been accepted, and before the mortgage has been finalized.

 

Who conducts an appraisal?

A licensed appraiser will determine the value of the home.

In Canada, there are two bodies that license and educate appraisers. They are the Canadian National Association of Real Estate Appraisers and the Appraisal Institute of Canada. Members of both associations are recognized by banks, credit unions, mortgage lenders, and mortgage insurers.

Lenders require that appraisals are done by companies on an approved list. A licensed mortgage broker ideally has knowledge of specific appraisers on the lender’s approved list and will be sure to choose one that is local, which ensures they’re up-to-date on neighbourhood factors that may affect a home’s value.

 

Who pays for an appraisal?

Usually, the purchaser pays the $300-$500 cost of an appraisal.

 

What is included in an appraisal?

1. Value

An appraiser will study the exterior and interior of your property, as well as the land surrounding it. They will also consider the value of secondary structures located on the land.

There are three main ways to calculate the value of a property: the direct comparison approach, the cost approach, and the income approach.

 

The direct comparison approach looks at comparable properties that have been sold in the recent past. Making adjustments by looking at the details of each property, the appraiser assigns a value that the property would reasonably earn on the open market.

The cost approach is a less common way of determining value for residential homes. It’s used when relevant comparable sales data does not exist. This method takes into account the value of the land, plus how much it would cost now to construct a similar home.

The income approach is used for multi-unit properties, where the income related to the property is a key determinant of its value.

 

It doesn’t matter which method your appraiser uses. What matters is the final number, because that affects how much a lender will agree to give you.

 

2. Rental income

When you purchase a rental property, you’ll have to declare what rent you’re going to charge. That can be substantiated by providing a rental agreement with someone who already lives there, or someone who will live there when you move in.

If there’s no rental agreement in place at the time of your purchase, an appraisal will calculate the rental potential by looking at similar properties in the immediate vicinity.

 

3. Photos

An appraisal will include photos of both the exterior and interior of a home, including the attic, piping, and insulation. However, it’s important to note that an appraisal is not the same as a home inspection. They may report on similar things, but an appraisal should never replace an inspection.

appraisals-do-not-replace-home-inspections

When is an appraisal required?

An appraisal is typically not needed when borrowers put less than 20 per cent down because the lender can take comfort from the fact that the loan is covered by insurance. But in some cases — when the value or the condition of a property is in question — the insurer can request an appraisal.

Most borrowers who put more than 20 per cent down are not covered by mortgage insurance, so an appraisal is required. When the property is not insured, there is no guaranteed value in it and the lender needs some other form of assurance that the loan will be repaid. An appraisal is part of that.

But there are two ways to avoid an appraisal.

One way is to use the automated valuation model. There must be enough relevant data for this model, which looks at a database of comparable sales and determine if your property’s price is within an acceptable range.

The other way is when the loan is a small percentage of the total purchase price. If you’ve put 50 per cent down, your lender may waive the right of appraisal.

 

What happens if something goes wrong with an appraisal?

Certain factors in a property’s construction can reduce the appraiser’s calculation of its value. For example, vermiculite insulation, Kitec plumbing, UFFI insulation, and knob-and-tube wiring can all bring your appraised value down.  This can make the property un-financeable for some lenders or may require it to be dealt with prior to closing or with purchase-plus or a hold back.

If an appraisal value is less than the purchase price, the purchaser must make up the difference.

For example, if you paid $749,000 for a home but an appraiser values it at $729,000, the bank will approve a loan based on the lower number. So you’ll have to come up with an extra $20,000 to make up the difference. If you can’t, you may no longer qualify to purchase the property.

Such a situation can be challenging on the short timeline of a home purchase, so it’s a good idea to have a contingency plan. It’s possible that you’ll learn that your home has a problem in the appraisal stage, and it’s never fun to be surprised at that point.

If you’re currently having challenges with an appraisal, contact us to find out how we can help.

Is it worth it to get a second opinion?

Yes. If you’re in doubt, it’s worth the peace of mind that comes with knowing your property was fairly and accurately assessed.

That’s especially true if your first appraisal comes in lower than expected. After a second opinion, the bank may choose one or the other of the reports, or they may take an average of the two. Either way, it’s worth knowing that your property was fairly assessed.

Does an appraisal affect my taxes?

No. It’s not the same as a tax assessment, and your home’s appraisal is not shared with tax assessors.

 

Do you have questions about appraisals or the mortgage process? Book a call to discuss how we can help with your mortgage needs.